Sony Open in Hawaii
There are few places on the PGA Tour schedule that caddies would rather be than in Hawaii for the Sony Open… unless there’s the imminent threat of a ballistic missile and you think, “I’m going to die today.” That’s what happened in 2018 and caddies had plenty of time to ponder, “is this it?” before the alert was deemed a false alarm. Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

Life on the PGA Tour is pretty sweet.

Those who make their living on the Tour – as players and caddies – are chasing the sun most weeks, traveling from one vacation destination after another, after another.

And that isn’t to say life on the Tour is a vacation. It’s not. Their offices are usually just a lot cooler than yours.

But on Saturday, January 13, 2018, life on the PGA Tour was briefly harrowing for those who were in Honolulu – paradise – for the Sony Open in Hawaii.

RELATED: Eric Larson was a successful PGA Tour caddie before — and after — spending 11 years in federal prison. This is his story.

That’s when anyone who had a smartphone – and who doesn’t these days – received a terrifying alert that read: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Say what?

The push alert was issued shortly after 8 a.m., so not many were at Waialae Country Club for the third round just yet.

Within 10 minutes, it was known the alarm was nothing more than a big mistake. But that timeframe depended on how connected you were. For many on the island, it was between 30-60 minutes after the message before they knew for sure that it was a false alarm.

Regardless of the timeframe, every second had to feel like an eternity under the circumstances.

Check out this video of a man enjoying a casual round of golf that morning… before he received the alert:

With the anniversary of that week here, we asked 10 caddies to give us their firsthand account of what those uncertain moments were like.

Scroll through to read their stories…